Announcements

Opening the Word: The suffering servant

Opening the Word: The suffering servant

Jesus does not die a happy death. Having proclaimed the Passion this week, we know. We know about the sufferings that he enduredupon the cross. We know about the plot, made by a friend, to put him to death. But how often do we consider the loneliness … read on

Editorial: Authentic belonging

Editorial: Authentic belonging

The children’s educational program “Sesame Street” made national headlines in mid-March with its announcement that, beginning in April, new Muppet Julia would represent a young child with autism. For the 1 in 6 children diagnosed with a developmental … read on

Eye on Culture: Stuff comes up

Eye on Culture: Stuff comes up

Last month my husband and I spoke at a marriage enrichment retreat in Ohio. It was a lovely event that offered encouraging talks from several married couples, breakout sessions, the Sacrament of Reconciliation, as well as Mass and a very nice date nig… read on

Taking Note: Attentiveness to God

Taking Note: Attentiveness to God

“Take time to heal your inner self through meditation. Give your mind a few moments of ‘nothingness’ each day. Concentrate on your breathing to achieve a state of relaxation and peacefulness.” After a long conference day — speaking and meeting readers and friends and supporters — my temptation was to see what Donald Trump event had everyone buzzin. But the note, flagged “meditation,” left by the room attendant was enough to prod an examination of conscience: What really is the best use of a few minutes of downtime? Recollection or MSNBC? While the note would not offend any “spiritual not religious” sensibilities, it did strike me as refreshingly countercultural. As traffic below whisked by the windows, even at a late hour, all into the night and early morning, the message was about slowing down and tuning out the noise. Slowing down may happen, but what do we do and what do we pour into ourselves as we do so? In his book, “ Contemplative Provocations ” (Ignatius, $17.95), Father Donald Haggerty, a New York archdiocesan priest who has spent extensive time with the Missionaries of Charity, writes about the “need for recollection as a prelude to prayer.” He says that it “contains a certain dilemma besides the difficulty of attaining it. It implies that a mental concentration is necessary if one is to pray. And so the demand to corral our wandering thoughts, to tie them down and keep them from breaching the enclosure of prayer. If we succeed in this effort, it is thought, we can presumably dwell on ‘spiritual things.’” The challenge, as always, is about love. “Attentiveness to God is desirable in prayer,” Father Haggerty writes. “But the attention we are to cultivate comes from love, not a mental discipline directed simply at thoughts. What we should seek is a recollection that surrenders us to someone entirely beyond our thought, a beloved who will never stop to rest for long within a particular thought.” In other words, it’s not about nothing, and it’s not about us, either, and our initiative or strategy. It’s about what God wants to do with the time we give. It’s about trusting God with our whole lives. It’s about letting him show us what he wants that to look like. Our challenge is the loving surrender to him to do with us as he wills. That “spiritual not religious” trend may just be an indictment of what we’re doing with our free time. How much of it is in adoration? How much of it is in self-giving? Do we convey joy, even while “off duty”? How “ All In ,” as Pat Gohn writes in the title of her recent book on faith are we, really? When Mother Angelica — whose eventual beatification Mass I’m looking forward to —died around this time last year, the Mass program for the Mass in Hanceville, Alabama, included, “And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being changed into his likeness from one degree of glory to another; for this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit” (2 Cor 3:18). Is that happening? Is that what we’re giving ourselves over to? With every business trip and carpool — whatever it is we’re doing? Are we careful about what we pour into ourselves? Do we treat ourselves — one another — as the tabernacles he’s asked us to be? And do we take everything as a reminder that that’s who we are about — all in, all his? Are we beholding his glory wherever we are? With or without the rare explicit invitation, we must strive for a posture of being that is something more contemplative. Kathryn Jean Lopez is senior fellow at the National Review Institute, editor-at-large of National Review, and co-author of “How to Defend the Faith Without Raising Your Voice” (OSV, $17.95). read on

Pastoral Answers: Impossible perfection

Pastoral Answers: Impossible perfection

Question : Matthew 5:48 says, “Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.” It seems to me that, knowing man’s fallibility and knowing the impossibility of man being perfect, that perhaps Jesus was not saying “perfect” as we understand … read on

Letters to the editor for April 9-15, 2017

Letters to the editor for April 9-15, 2017

Gender confusion Re: “How to talk to your kids about gender issues” (In Focus, March 12-28). Man and woman are created by God to honor and praise him. How does “transgender” fit into that equation? How can altering one’s sex make one pleasing to God? … read on

Attentiveness to God

Attentiveness to God

“Take time to heal your inner self through meditation. Give your mind a few moments of ‘nothingness’ each day. Concentrate on your breathing to achieve a state of relaxation and peacefulness.” After a long conference day — speaking and meeting readers… read on

Letters to the Editor for March 26-April 1, 2017

Letters to the Editor for March 26-April 1, 2017

Boy Scouts’ transgender policy raises concern Re: “Boy Scouts to admit transgender youth” (Feb. 26-March 4). I read with great interest this particular article, as my family has been active in Boy Scouts for over 10 years (I have three boys ages 17, 1… read on

Temper tantrums

Temper tantrums

A few years ago, I was traveling to Florida for a speaking engagement. If anyone has ever visited Orlando, you know how busy that area is — starting with the Orlando airport. The scene that unfolded before me as I attempted to get off the tram and head toward baggage claim is similar to what we’ve been seeing in the sometimes unruly and violent protests that have occurred since the election. A woman was traveling with her son, who looked to be between 2-3 years old. When the tram stopped and everyone began to exit, the little boy became unglued. Apparently he thought he was already at Disney World and the tram was a fantastic ride that had just ended, and he didn’t understand why. He would not take “no” for an answer. The tram was packed with other parents trying to collect their toddlers (along with their numerous carry-ons and strollers). There were plenty of other folks like me also doing their best to get to their destinations. However, the mom made it almost impossible for several of us to go on our merry way. Her son refused to move beyond the platform just outside the doors of the tram. He immediately dropped to the floor and began screaming as toddlers often do when they don’t get their way. Instead of quickly scooping him up and moving along, the mom thought it would be best to try and reason with her toddler, despite that her attempt to negotiate was putting others literally in harm’s way. Several travelers, myself included, practically tripped over the little boy and his mom as we tried to exit the train. I managed eventually to make it around the two of them, and as I hurried off I could still hear the boy making quite a ruckus and drowning out his mother. Sound familiar? Just take a look at some of the protests and counterprotests that have been happening around the nation. A recent case in point is the agitator who decided to do his best to disrupt a peaceful, mid-February Students for Life rally on the University of Michigan campus by acting much like that toddler in Orlando. As speakers began their presentations from the podium, the student burst into a loud scream until he lost his breath. He apparently just couldn’t handle what he was hearing. This happened repeatedly and, again, much like the little boy who didn’t get his way, when the presenters tried to reason with him he became even more agitated and screamed more loudly than before. Unlike the mother of the screaming child, however, the presenters quickly realized they weren’t going to get anywhere with this student. They ignored him and went ahead with their event, and when the bully realized he no longer had an audience he stopped screaming and disappeared into the crowd. Like what you’re reading? Subscribe now in print or digital . In order for concerned Catholic Christians trying to do our best to embrace — and share — the truth of our faith in an increasingly hostile environment, we need to be like the other Orlando travelers on the train that day. We have to ignore the temper tantrums and keep our eyes focused on Christ so we can get where we need to be spiritually. We have to keep teaching and preaching the truth in love, but we also have to remember that sometimes there are those who are not ready to listen. Life is definitely a journey, but today too many see it as a gravy train — a free ride that never ends. We pray for them. We are always willing and ready to answer questions, to extend a helping hand reminding them of God’s mercy. But we can’t allow those who are still like little children, absolutely refusing to take “no” for an answer, to stop us in our tracks and cause us to stumble. Teresa Tomeo is the host of “Catholic Connection,” produced by Ave Maria Radio and heard daily on EWTN Global Catholic Radio and SiriusXM Channel 130. read on

This Lent, share love

This Lent, share love

“That look on your face! The look on his!” A colleague stopped by my office at the end of a long day. He stopped, looked down and saw a photo he hadn’t seen before of me with Pope Benedict XVI. It was from October 2012 and was at the opening Mass for the Year of Faith. It also happened to be the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council. I had gotten a call a week or so before asking if I’d go to Rome and accept a message from the pope on behalf of all the women of the world. I write a little about this in a chapter for a book coming out this spring called “When Women Pray.” Pope Benedict was reissuing a statement that Blessed Paul VI had offered to all the women of the world at the closing of the council. The message reads, in part: “At this moment when the human race is undergoing so deep a transformation, women impregnated with the spirit of the Gospel can do so much to aid mankind in not falling.” And it concludes with: “Women of the entire universe, whether Christian or nonbelieving, you to whom life is entrusted at this grave moment in history, it is for you to save the peace of the world.” I often think: What a different world we’d live in if people even knew this is what the Catholic Church thinks about women — and if we lived this. Impregnated with the spirit of the Gospel. But then, the same is true of Christianity itself. Living the Beatitudes, living the love we profess to believe in, would change things. The anger. The despair. The indifference. It would all look so different. Archbishop Charles J. Chaput of Philadelphia makes this point in his new book, “Strangers in a Strange Land” (Henry Holt, $26). “There are no unhappy saints, and joy and hope are constant themes in the work of Pope Francis,” he writes. “Like St. Paul, he sees the source of Christian joy in the act of preaching the Gospel, in a passion for living the Good News and actively sharing the passion for living the Good News and actively sharing the person of Jesus Christ with others.” He adds, about Pope Francis: “This is why he has such urgent words for tepid Christians. This is why he can never seem so impatient with believers who let their hearts grow numb. If we don’t share the faith, we lose it.” It seems so simple, and yet we all know how hard it can be. That day with Pope Benedict, I was overjoyed. Not because I was meeting the pope, as much an honor as that was. It was the look of love on his face. The message he handed me that day was overflowing with love, and so were his eyes. I could see the message. He was the message. Love was the message. It was just a window into the beauty of the gaze of God the Father. Do we look at others with that gaze? Like what you’re reading? Subscribe now in print or digital . We all know “They will know we are Christians by our love.” So many people today do not know love, because they do not see it from us. Maybe this Lent, we could start smiling. Looking up from our phones and looking into people’s eyes. Those closest to us and those we would have otherwise overlooked. We’re made in the image and likeness of God. What if your gaze upon someone today is the only time they’ve seen that love? What if it’s the only time they could see if might be possible that they were loved into existence? We get busy. We get burdened. I know. But we can recover the joy that is the life we claim to lead. Love this Lent. Is there any doubt that’s what is needed? Kathryn Jean Lopez is senior fellow at the National Review Institute, editor-at-large of National Review, and co-author of “ How to Defend the Faith Without Raising Your Voice” (OSV, $17.95). read on